Advice, fashion, Social Commentary

Dammit, Nasty Gal

It’s been two months now (that is a total guesstamation) since I’ve bought any clothing from Forever21 or H&M. Or at least it’s been long enough that I genuinely can’t remember the last time I spent an hour cruising through the multi floored Clackamas Town Center Forever21, loading my arms up with $19 Stevie Nicksy velvet dresses and $4 tank tops. I think the addiction has officially been killed.

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Also, come on now….

I’m impressed with myself because I work pretty much only on a system of instant gratification. But once I put it on the damn blog, I usually have to follow through.

Sidenote: my winter coat is from Forever21. A big beast of a tan parka lined with faux fur. I got it at Buffalo Exchange during last year’s HUGE snow storm (sarcasm font, where is my sarcasm font??) and ladies fall all over themselves over that  jacket. But dammit, it was second hand so I feel less bad about it.

So where have I been shopping instead?

The honest answer is I have no idea where to shop currently.

I was all excited about Nasty Gal since I can buy clothing made in good ol’ Los Angeles. A higher price point and a made in the USA tag made me feel like I was doing something better than giving to the fast fashion empire of Forever21.

But then you read articles like this detailing how the Nasty Gal founder is a bad boss who fires pregnant women to avoid paying maternity leave and if that wasn’t enough finding things like this about sweatshops in L.A..

Granted, running a million dollar brand isn’t done by just one person. It’s not like Sophia Amoruso is calling every single shot. But still. It makes me feel a bit icky supporting that.

So I’m back on the hunt for affordably priced clothing that isn’t made in sweatshops and don’t have terrible people running the business.

Deep sigh here, kids.

Alta Gracia  is a living wage company and that’s awesome. I sure do wish their clothing was…fashionable….

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Reformation makes legit, beautiful clothes that I can’t find any reason to not buy. Other than paying over $100 for one dress is hard to swallow.

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Though I know all the work that can go into sewing one dress. Paying $100 shouldn’t be that big of a deal. It means having less pieces in your closet but having better quality ones. Dresses that maybe you won’t fling on the floor and let your dog sleep on….

Good Guide can hep you figure out everything from if your shampoo is green to the social impact of the clothing you buy. Sounds useful and depressing!

These are big changes to make. Green shampoo, cruelty free make-up, ethical clothing. Not to mention what you eat, the trash you produce and OHMYGODMYHEADISGOINGTOEXPLODE!!!!!!!!

Take it in baby steps. Do a little research. Pick one thing and focus on it. I’ll be here at my desk, slugging down ethically grown coffee and organic nacho cheese shots and trying to find more ethical fashion for you to throw money at.

xo-Monroe

 

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3 thoughts on “Dammit, Nasty Gal

  1. It’s a rough one. I remember reading somewhere that kids used in child labour in garment factories end up having to work as child prostitutes when is a crackdown on child labour. Working in a sweatshop is obviously hideous, but the alternative can be worse. Even if the entire western world stopped buying “fast fashion” and textiles, people would still be suffering. Families are so poor they have no choice but to send their children out to work, and if not in a sweatshop, then some other hideous form of child labour. Bottom line the governments in such countries should be doing more for their people, instead of mismanaging/embezzling. For example Kerala, a state in India has a democratic socialist welfare government and the people are doing pretty well, as opposed to other states where the government is, well, hideous. https://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/whats-keralas-secret/

    I totally commend you on raising awareness and avoiding unethically produced garments though. What about thrift store dressing? It’s already been made, and you’re not supporting the industry with you $$$, just the charity that runs the store. Or you could just dress in punjammies and be really comfortable knowing that your clothes are actually supporting women, rather than exploiting them. https://www.sudara.org/

  2. Pingback: Buy This: Julie K Lingerie | VanityHag

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